Oliver Twist 105


|<<   <<   >>

‚Oh yes, I understand–perfectly,‘ replied Fagin, telling the truth for once. ‚Good-night! Good-night!‘

With many adieus and good wishes, Mr. Fagin went his way. Noah Claypole, bespeaking his good lady’s attention, proceeded to enlighten her relative to the arrangement he had made, with all that haughtiness and air of superiority, becoming, not only a member of the sterner sex, but a gentleman who appreciated the dignity of a special appointment on the kinchin lay, in London and its vicinity.

CHAPTER XLIII

WHEREIN IS SHOWN HOW THE ARTFUL DODGER GOT INTO TROUBLE

‚And so it was you that was your own friend, was it?‘ asked Mr. Claypole, otherwise Bolter, when, by virtue of the compact entered into between them, he had removed next day to Fagin’s house. “Cod, I thought as much last night!‘

‚Every man’s his own friend, my dear,‘ replied Fagin, with his most insinuating grin. ‚He hasn’t as good a one as himself anywhere.‘

‚Except sometimes,‘ replied Morris Bolter, assuming the air of a man of the world. ‚Some people are nobody’s enemies but their own, yer know.‘

‚Don’t believe that,‘ said Fagin. ‚When a man’s his own enemy, it’s only because he’s too much his own friend; not because he’s careful for everybody but himself. Pooh! pooh! There ain’t such a thing in nature.‘

‚There oughn’t to be, if there is,‘ replied Mr. Bolter.

‚That stands to reason. Some conjurers say that number three is the magic number, and some say number seven. It’s neither, my friend, neither. It’s number one.

‚Ha! ha!‘ cried Mr. Bolter. ‚Number one for ever.‘

‚In a little community like ours, my dear,‘ said Fagin, who felt it necessary to qualify this position, ‚we have a general number one, without considering me too as the same, and all the other young people.‘

‚Oh, the devil!‘ exclaimed Mr. Bolter.

‚You see,‘ pursued Fagin, affecting to disregard this interruption, ‚we are so mixed up together, and identified in our interests, that it must be so. For instance, it’s your object to take care of number one–meaning yourself.‘

‚Certainly,‘ replied Mr. Bolter. ‚Yer about right there.‘

‚Well! You can’t take care of yourself, number one, without taking care of me, number one.‘

‚Number two, you mean,‘ said Mr. Bolter, who was largely endowed with the quality of selfishness.

‚No, I don’t!‘ retorted Fagin. ‚I’m of the same importance to you, as you are to yourself.‘

‚I say,‘ interrupted Mr. Bolter, ‚yer a very nice man, and I’m very fond of yer; but we ain’t quite so thick together, as all that comes to.‘

‚Only think,‘ said Fagin, shrugging his shoulders, and stretching out his hands; ‚only consider. You’ve done what’s a very pretty thing, and what I love you for doing; but what at the same time would put the cravat round your throat, that’s so very easily tied and so very difficult to unloose–in plain English, the halter!‘

Mr. Bolter put his hand to his neckerchief, as if he felt it inconveniently tight; and murmured an assent, qualified in tone but not in substance.

‚The gallows,‘ continued Fagin, ‚the gallows, my dear, is an ugly finger-post, which points out a very short and sharp turning that has stopped many a bold fellow’s career on the broad highway. To keep in the easy road, and keep it at a distance, is object number one with you.‘

‚Of course it is,‘ replied Mr. Bolter. ‚What do yer talk about such things for?‘

‚Only to show you my meaning clearly,‘ said the Jew, raising his eyebrows. ‚To be able to do that, you depend upon me. To keep my little business all snug, I depend upon you. The first is your number one, the second my number one. The more you value your number one, the more careful you must be of mine; so we come at last to what I told you at first–that a regard for number one holds us all together, and must do so, unless we would all go to pieces in company.‘

‚That’s true,‘ rejoined Mr. Bolter, thoughtfully. ‚Oh! yer a cunning old codger!‘

Mr. Fagin saw, with delight, that this tribute to his powers was no mere compliment, but that he had really impressed his recruit with a sense of his wily genius, which it was most important that he should entertain in the outset of their acquaintance. To strengthen an impression so desirable and useful, he followed up the blow by acquainting him, in some detail, with the magnitude and extent of his operations; blending truth and fiction together, as best served his purpose; and bringing both to bear, with so much art, that Mr. Bolter’s respect visibly increased, and became tempered, at the same time, with a degree of wholesome fear, which it was highly desirable to awaken.

‚It’s this mutual trust we have in each other that consoles me under heavy losses,‘ said Fagin. ‚My best hand was taken from me, yesterday morning.‘

‚You don’t mean to say he died?‘ cried Mr. Bolter.

‚No, no,‘ replied Fagin, ’not so bad as that. Not quite so bad.‘

‚What, I suppose he was–‚


|<<   <<   >>

Schreiben Sie einen Kommentar

Ihre E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.